David Allen Reeves Photography

All images copyright David Allen Reeves

Posts tagged photography

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DavidAllenReeves

Hey everyone! I probably should have set this up like two years ago, but better late than never! I finally purchased a photo printer, so now I’m able to start my own business and finally get prints to those who were asking. I’m also in the process of building some frames to package them with in the future, but for now- prints! I’m selling my paper cutout pieces for $25 (8x12) and $45 (12x18). Anything else, let me know via email. Thank you!

Filed under david allen reeves photography etsy etsy shop paper cutout diorama

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Happy New Year, everyone! Sorry I’ve been so infrequent with the posts. I graduated from NSCAD, packed all my shit and moved it back to RI, then immediately went on vacation to Bonaire with my family- all within 5 days! I’ll post a bunch of pictures next week, promise! I hope you are all doing well and have a productive year. Thank you so much for the support, you have mine! Cheers 

Happy New Year, everyone! Sorry I’ve been so infrequent with the posts. I graduated from NSCAD, packed all my shit and moved it back to RI, then immediately went on vacation to Bonaire with my family- all within 5 days! I’ll post a bunch of pictures next week, promise! I hope you are all doing well and have a productive year. Thank you so much for the support, you have mine! Cheers 

Filed under david allen reeves photography artist on tumblr night bonaire stars

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Hi everyone,

For the past two months I’ve been giving myself a crash course in painting and sculpture. At first I was interested in mimicking the form and texture of cooked food as a way to trick the viewer into being hungry, but now I also see this as a reflection of my childhood. The materials used in the series are styrofoam, paper, modeling paste, cardboard, cork, acrylic paint, and conte crayon. 

Food:

When I was a child, I enjoyed watching my mom prepare and cook meals in the kitchen. My interest deepened when I realized the meals took actual hard work to create and didn’t just fall onto my plate. I liked to help my mom with whatever she would let me do. The simple act of peeling carrots or shredding cheese was the most phenomenal thing- especially when using the grinder for making hash. I liked the feeling of combining seemingly ordinary things together to make a single complete form. Eventually, I worked in a professional kitchen and learned many techniques that I later discussed with my mom. I would learn one cooking method from my bosses, but was always more interested in how she did it differently. We trade recipes back and forth all the time, giving inspiration for last minute meals.

My dad is a modest man with a good sense of humor. He has worked as a small engine aircraft mechanic for thirty years, and before that as a carpenter. He has always been a hands-on type of person, constantly fixing things around the house that seem to wait until his day off to break down. Some days, starting when I was fourteen, I would tag along with him to work at the hanger. I wouldn’t get tasked with any jobs that were that dangerous; cleaning the belly of a plane with gasoline or Varsol, using a wheel grinder to clean the burrs off spark plugs, or changing the oil (and hopefully remembering the drip pan this time). Watching my dad work was inspiring. He never appeared to feel stressed while doing any of it, rather totally focused. Once I watched him test the fuel/air mixture on a plane while it was running- his hand inches away from the spinning propeller. Afterwards, he didn’t speak a word about it, and shifted his concentration to the next job.

This photographic series is made up of visual representations of meals that I associate with happiness and fulfillment. While I have learned a variety of international and complicated dishes over the years, I thought these best reflected where I come from and what I can truly identify with. The imitation of form comes from both of my parents’ attention to detail, but also as a comment on to the food simulacra we see in advertisements.

            Each day, millions of new images appear on the Internet, often from questionable or unknown sources. Some of these images spread like viruses, regardless of proof of legitimacy. If one sees a picture that has all the elements and textures of a grilled steak, but is really just shaped and painted Styrofoam, how does this change one’s interpretation? And how will it change their future interpretations of food advertisements? Most of us are familiar with the disappointing, “That’s not what it looked like on the box” feeling. Advertisements often mimic art in a way to sell a product; I thought it would be fun for art to mimic advertisements as a way to sell my own product. 

Filed under David A. Reeves Photography food fakefood simulacrum artist on tumblr styrofoam paper paint

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Here’s a couple of night shots I experimented with last week. I started using this expired box of Kodak Tri-X Pan that has given me some great results. My exposure and processing times shifted a bit in the switch from Ilford HP5+. These were shot on a Toyo field camera at f/16 @ 3-4 minutes and developed in xtol (1:1) for 8:30- in case other photographers were interested. 

Filed under david a. reeves halifax night photography kodak

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4x5 print I took from my balcony in Halifax. Little pigeon flew in the middle of the frame! kinda like it though. There’s also a passenger in the truck giving me the stink eye I saw when i scanned the negative and zoomed in haha.  If i remember correctly, I shot it at 1/8s @ f/45 with ilford hp5, shot/processed for 200asa. the print is 28x35”.

4x5 print I took from my balcony in Halifax. Little pigeon flew in the middle of the frame! kinda like it though. There’s also a passenger in the truck giving me the stink eye I saw when i scanned the negative and zoomed in haha.  If i remember correctly, I shot it at 1/8s @ f/45 with ilford hp5, shot/processed for 200asa. the print is 28x35”.

Filed under david a reeves photography film toyo 4x5 ilford hp5 halifax

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"One year and three-hundred sixty-four days": This is the beginning of an ongoing series of couples. The title refers to the length of the relationship. I’m interested in the way two people connect; the way their eyes meet, the way their postures and other physical similarities start to imitate one another. The person not being photographed was sitting next to the camera lens and I was off hidden behind the lighting fixture, to make the two feel as relaxed as possible. Like I said, it’s just the beginning of something I’m interested in making a long term project. That said, I would love to photograph and include you and your partner in this series! (Shot with a 4x5 toyo field camera and Ilford Harry Potter 5.)

Filed under toyo 4x5 film david allen reeves photography halifax nova scotia portrait